Alex Tatum, PhD

Postdoctoral fellow, Program in Human Sexuality (PHS)

Alex Tatum

Contact Info

Postdoctoral fellow, Program in Human Sexuality (PHS)


Human Sexuality Fellowship, University of Minnesota

PhD, Loyola University Chicago

Summary

Alex Tatum, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow with research and clinical interests in LGBTQ mental health, minority stress, compulsive sexual behavior, romantic relationship concerns, and substance use/abuse. He received his doctorate from Loyola University Chicago, and his dissertation examined the effects of workplace environments on sexual minority employees’ work satisfaction. As a clinician, Dr. Tatum integrates existential, client-centered, and cognitive-behavioral techniques to address underlying stress associated with relational and/or sexual concerns. His previous clinical work includes psychotherapy and assessment experience at university counseling centers and community mental health clinics in the Twin Cities, Chicago, and Atlanta metropolitan areas.

Pronouns: he/him/his

Expertise

LGBTQ mental health, minority stress, compulsive sexual behavior, romantic relationship concerns, and substance use/abuse

Research

Publications

Tatum, A. K. (in press). Workplace climate and satisfaction in sexual minority populations: An application of social cognitive career theory. Journal of Counseling Psychology. doi: 10.1037/cou0000292

Tatum, A. K. (2017). Access to same-sex marriage, sexual minority identity, and subjective well-being. Journal of Homosexuality, 64(5), 638–653. doi: 10.1080/00918369.2016.1196991

Tatum, A. K., & Houston, E. (2017). Examining the interplay between depression, motivation, and antiretroviral therapy adherence: A social cognitive approach. AIDS Care, 29(3), 306–310. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2016.1220481

Tatum, A. K., Formica, L. J., & Brown, S. D. (2017). Testing a social cognitive model of workplace sexual identity management. Journal of Career Assessment, 25(1), 107–120. doi: 10.1177/1069072716659712

Tatum, A. K. (2016). Proximal minority stress processes and subjective well-being of leathermen. Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity, 3(3), 374–379. doi: 10.1037/sgd0000189