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Defining Sexual Health

Defining Sexual Health

Defining Sexual Health: Report of a Technical Consultation on Sexual Health (2006)

defining sexual health report imageIn 2002, the World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the World Association for Sexual Health (WAS), began a collaborative process to reflect on the state of sexual health globally and define the areas where WHO and its partners could provide guidance to national health managers, policy-makers, and care providers on how to better address sexual health. A technical consultation on sexual health was convened in Geneva, Switzerland, that brought together over 60 international experts from all regions of the world. This document contains newly revised working definitions of sex, sexuality, sexual health and sexual rights.

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Strategies to Promote Sexual Health on a Global, Regional, and National Level

Strategies to Promote Sexual Health on a Global, Regional, and National Level

Sexual Health for the Millennium: A Declaration and Technical Document (2008)

sexual health millennium imageThe World Association for Sexual Health (WAS) wrote Sexual Health for the Millennium: A Declaration and Technical Document. The goal of the document is to align sexual health goals with the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals, making the case for sexual health as a critical part of human development. This document specifies and elaborates on eight distinct but inter-related aspects of sexual health that play important roles in fostering human development.

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Sexuality: A Missing Dimension in Development (2008)

sexuality missing dimension imageThe Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) wrote this paper to illuminate the relationship between sexuality, rights and development. The paper clearly shows, there are strong linkages between not just sexuality, and health and gender, but also with other sectors such as agriculture, roads and infrastructure, and human rights and good governance. These linkages have not previously been well conceptualized at Sida, which makes this concept paper groundbreaking and important.

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Linking Sexual and Reproductive Health and Gender Programs and Services with Prevention of HIV/STI (2010)

linking reproductive genderThe publication is targeted at health sector decision makers as well as sexual health, reproductive health, and HIV/STI program and service managers as a guide for coordination and collaboration that transcends the mere recognition and mutual endorsement of programs and services to create synergies among them. The document is the result of a series of intensive expert consultations organized by Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) with the participation of other United Nations agencies.

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National HIV Strategy (2010)

national hiv strategyIn 2011 the White House Office of National AIDS Policy released the nation’s first-ever comprehensive, coordinated HIV/AIDS roadmap with clear and measureable targets to be achieved by 2015. The strategy was developed with three primary goals in mind:

  • Reducing HIV incidence
  • Increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes
  • Reducing HIV-related health disparities

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National HIV/AIDS Strategy: Implementation Update (2011)

National Prevention Strategy National Prevention Strategy: America’s Plan for Better Health and Wellness (2011)

national prevention strategyThe strategy released by the National Prevention, Health Promotion, and Pubic Health Council in the Office of the Surgeon General identifies sexual and reproductive health as a priority to achieving overall health.

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Promotion of Sexual Health: Recommendations for Action (2000)

promotion sexual healthTwenty-five years after the World Health Organization’s (WHO) first publication about educating and training health professionals about human sexuality, in 2000, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in collaboration with the World Association for Sexual Health (WAS) called a regional consultation in Antigua Guatemala, Guatemala, to re-examine how to promote Sexual Health, enhance sexuality training, and develop a comprehensive approach to addressing sexuality problems.

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A Public Health Approach for Advancing Sexual Health in the United States: Rationale and Options for Implementation (2011)

public health approachIn 2011 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP) convened experts from various backgrounds and interests in sexual health including individuals from public interest groups, communities of faith, sexual health researchers, professional organizations, media and communications, private sector businesses, and government agencies. This report highlights the consultation proceedings and is intended to engage future partners and spur continued conversations for the initiatives to advance sexual health in the United States.

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Prevention and Treatment of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender People: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach (2011)

prevention treatment hivThe World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines include evidence-based recommendations, the summary and grading of evidence, implementation issues and key research gaps for prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among men who have sex with men and transgender people. Although the focus of this guidance is on low- and middle-income countries, WHO recommends that this guidance be available for MSM and transgender people in high-income countries as well.

The document presents good practice recommendations that focus on ensuring an enabling environment for the recognition and protection of the human rights of MSM and transgender people. Without such conditions, implementation of the more specific technical recommendations is problematic.

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Promoting Sexual Rights

Promoting Sexual Rights

Declaration of Sexual Rights (2014)

declaration sexual rightsIn order to assure that human beings and societies develop healthy sexuality, the World Association for Sexual Health (WAS) has outlined sexual rights that must be recognized, promoted, respected, and defended by all societies through all means.

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Sexual Rights: An IPPF Declaration (2008)

sexual rightsThe International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) published this declaration as a tool for organizations, activists, researchers, policy- and decision-makers who are working to promote and ensure human rights. The goal is to enable members of the sexual and reproductive health and human rights communities to create change and build on the momentum that has already begun around sexual rights in preparation for the next International Conference on Population and Development in 2015.

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Promoting Sexuality Education

Promoting Sexuality Education

It’s All One Curriculum: Guidelines and Activities for a Unified Approach to Sexuality, Gender, HIV, and Human Rights Education (2009)

all one guidelinesThe International Sexuality and HIV Curriculum Working Group developed this resource kit that is designed to help educators around the world develop or adapt an existing curriculum to educate young people on their sexual and reproductive health. Through a gender equality and human rights based focus, youth are empowered to enjoy dignity, equality, and healthy, responsible, and satisfying sexual lives.

All One Curriculum: Guidelines

All One Curriculum: Activities

National Sexuality Education Standards: Core Content and Skills, K–12 (2011)

national sexualityThe National Sexuality Education Standards were developed to address the inconsistent implementation of sexuality education nationwide and the limited time allocated to teaching the topic. The goal of the standards is to provide clear, consistent and straightforward guidance on the essential minimum, core content for sexuality education that is age-appropriate for students in grades K–12. The Standards are presented by both topic area and by grade level. The development of these standards is a result of an ongoing initiative, the Future of Sex Education (FoSE) which includes experts from the fields of health education, sexuality education, public health, public policy, philanthropy, and advocacy.

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Standards for Sexuality Education in Europe: A Framework for Policy Makers, Educational and Health Authorities and Specialists (2010)

standards for sexualityDeveloped by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, the Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA), and experts from nine European countries, these standards are to apply to all European WHO Member States. They outline a general introduction to the importance of sexuality education in school and the underlying concepts. In addition, a comprehensive overview provides information on the subjects that should be covered by the curriculum for the individual age groups. The special feature of this matrix is that, above and beyond the topics, it also indicates which skills children and young people should acquire, and which attitudes should be promoted. The standards are based on a positive interpretation of sexuality, which they consider to be a part of physical and mental health. Such topics as HIV/AIDS, unwanted pregnancies and sexual violence are embedded in all-embracing education that focuses on the self-determination of the individual and people’s responsibility for themselves and others.

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Eliminating Sex and Gender Related Stigma and Discrimination

Eliminating Sex and Gender Related Stigma and Discrimination

The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding (2011)

health of lbgtaThe Institute of Medicine (IOM) report assesses the state of science on the health status of LGBT populations, identifies research gaps and opportunities, and outlines a research agenda for the National Institute of Health. The report examines the health status of these populations in three life stages: childhood and adolescence, early/middle adulthood, and later adulthood. At each life stage, the committee studied mental health, physical health, risks and protective factors, health services, and contextual influences. To advance understanding of the health needs of all LGBT individuals, the report finds that researchers need more data about the demographics of these populations, improved methods for collecting and analyzing data, and an increased participation of sexual and gender minorities in research.

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State Sponsored Homophobia (2013)

state sponsoredThe International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, and Intersex Association (ILGA) has published a world survey of laws prohibiting same sex activity between consenting adults.

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ILGA also published a map of Lesbian and Gay Rights in the World (2013) available in several languages.

Sexual Health and Your Patients: A Provider’s Guide

Sexual Health and Your Patients: A Provider’s Guide

Sexual Health and Your Patients: A Provider’s Guide

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This guide was created to help primary care providers (physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurse-midwives) learn how to better incorporate sexual health discussions and recommended preventive sexual health services into an adult or adolescent wellness visit. Although intended for primary care, providers in other care settings may also find it useful. It is a companion to Take Charge of Your Sexual Health: What you need to know about preventive services, a guide for consumers developed by the National Coalition for Sexual Health. This guide includes only essential sexual health information with a focus on prevention, not comprehensive information on all aspects of sexual health. It also does not include detailed information about transgender care, which is highly individualized and beyond the scope of this guide.